Social Photography

As a public relations practitioner, you may be expected to take photos for the client you work for. Professional or not, you’ll have to do it and now is a better time than later to do so. That’s why this week’s PR assignment is to learn social photography by taking at least 3-5 photos, taking into consideration the framing, the background, alignment, and overall composition. We also had to make a Flickr account and understand its functions.

Because I went home for the weekend, I was able to play around with my brother’s old Nikon D60. Please note that I have no expertise in photography, nor do I know how to use such a camera. Rather than use the lens the camera originally came with, my brother suggested I use this other lens which allows me to play around with the aperture, causing a more artsy effect by blurring.

What I’ve learned is that I’m terrible at framing. I took quite a lot of shots. It was a little frustrating as well that the camera kept auto-focusing on the wrong spot. I was told later how to manually do it though. I definitely don’t have the artistic vision, so I’ll stick with writing and running. Regardless, it was a fun experiment. I’m sure clients that need you to take pictures for them don’t expect something overly spectacular, but knowing how to do a simple and decent job is a plus.

In terms of Flickr, the site is really easy to use. Uploading is made simple by either dragging photos in or going directly to your folders and selecting the one you want. Flickr offers quick edit options as well through a partner company called Aviary. You don’t have to make an Aviary account. It’ll just open up within Flickr and you can do basic edits such as cropping and changing the orientation of the photo. I don’t know what companies can do with Flickr, but I imagine they can use it as a hosting site for their event photos or give a chronological history of their company through pictures.

Below are a few pictures I took while I was at home. You can find additional photos on my Flickr page.

Palm Tree

Palm tree in my backyard

Lemon

Lemon Tree

Diving Board

Diving board

Green Lantern vs. Trunks

Green Lantern vs. Trunks

Literature Books

Literature books

Medals

My running medals

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3 responses

  1. I am also a rookie photographer. I am fond of photographing but it is really hard for me to take the framing, background, alignment, and overall composition into consideration. To improve my photographing skills, I have exerted tremendous fascination on some photo-retouching software. They are fantastic! I can add various effects on my photos and make them look different. But sometimes, over-embellishment and over-refinement will make pictures unnatural. By the way, I do like the pictures you took, maybe because you used a Nikon D60, or did you also use some Photoshop software to make it better?

    1. Thanks! I used the Nikon D60 with no retouching. Photo-retouching software is nice, but I think a true photographer is one who can take amazing pictures with just their camera. This includes the types of lens and flash they use to make it stylistic, which will be costly, but it means they know what they’re doing. Retouching skills are good too, but it’s something that comes second. As my brother (who does photography) says, “Retouching every picture means you didn’t take a good picture”, which he admits he does too.

  2. Your photos are great! Don’t underestimate your talent!

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